Remote Viewing: Can Some People Target “Who”, While Others “Where”?

Written by Debra Lynne Katz www.debrakatz.com

First I just want to say I’d never have in a tasking, whether to myself or to others, the actual words “who” or “where”, as these specific words will send one into analytic mode faster than anything – but I  think perhaps the question instead should be: “can some remote viewers have an easier time and do a better job describing people, while others do better at describing locations?”.

 Id say yes, and that some readers have a natural inclination to focus on one or the other, but that absolutely doesn’t mean you can’t learn to improve tuning into what doesn’t come easily or naturally. I’d say, when it comes to those who do better at people targets, as in the case of those of us who started off doing intuitive based work with people and then come over to remote viewing real locations, events and photos, we really need to push ourselves to learn how, in a disciplined way, to focus on the more physical aspects of a target. This is why having self-discipline, or developing it, is essential in remote viewing. Remote viewing is not a lazy person’s hobby and that’s why I’ve known a lot of people who think it’s really cool and enjoy it until they are told, “no, you need to do more than tune into a few elements of a photo, you need to describe in details and you need to provide sketches, summaries and whatever else your manager requests”. A lot of people just don’t want to bother to do the effort it sometimes takes to get the information needed.

I’ve found that the sooner one knows ones natural inclinations of what is more exciting, attractive or simply easier to describe (which will usually be what is more exciting or attractive) and the sooner a person knows one’s own blind spots, the sooner one can give oneself a good talking to and say, “I know you just want to stay with the emotions, the excitement, the movement, the colors, whatever, but too bad! You are probably missing the most important thing about the target, so go to what needs describing, not what you want to describe”.  We have to talk to ourselves as if we were little kids wanting to play with our friends instead of paying attention to the teacher or the assignment.

I recommend, and I know other remote viewers do as well, that when you think you are done with your session, you look back and make sure that anything you even remotely got, like “there is a triangular thing off in the distance”, ask yourself : “did I really describe this enough? Because I have three pages about the angry guy wearing a uniform, but nothing else about that triangle” and then know you aren’t done. If you wrote : “There is something red”. Did you really explore what it was? You can always go back into a session after you completed it.

Now of course one of the biggest challenges of working with a totally blind target in Remote Viewing which is what we often do, is that you have no idea what you are supposed to be describing, so you don’t know whether the angry guy wearing a uniform is really important here or not. Does he keep showing up because he is important to the secret, undisclosed tasking question, or because he was just hanging around there and you found him personally interesting? Another problem is that maybe it’s all there is to the target – the guy. If you always assume there is a physical thing you probably missed and that you better stay in session or go back in and find it, then you’ll end up manufacturing something that is not there or wasting your time. I’ve had that happen too.

But still, most importantly, the key is that once have been doing this work for a while, you don’t get off the hook by saying “Well I’m not good at describing buildings or mountains, so I’ll just avoid those”. Instead, you should take an inventory of what you aren’t good at and find a way to only practice those kinds of targets. I have improved at so many aspects of targets that when I first started out, for years, I was sure I would never be good at, because they were so boring. I really used to think I’d never get over my blocks and weaknesses. However, the solution was having to work with a target pool for close to a year that only contained these “boring” targets. What I then found was that they became fascinating in their detail and nuances.  Now, the very things I used to miss, I’d be surprised if I did, while now other challenges pop up and have to contend with. Like many remote viewers, I’m still vulnerable to getting stuck in emotions and drama, so I have to remain conscious of this at all times. If you look for drama in a target and it’s not there, you will create it and get off track.

As far as those who aren’t used to tuning into people, well, I’d say some are just not people person. When you tune into people, there are a lot of emotions that not everyone wants to deal with. Even more significantly, other people are mirrors for us. If we aren’t ready to see something in ourselves, we aren’t going to be able to see it well in others and that’s when we’ll miss them, draw a blank or go unconscious. The bottom line is, one may have to do some personal work on oneself before they are ready to see certain things in others, so sometimes, they will still get the person, but not see aspects of the person.  Other times, they may just miss the person or they may just emotionally react, not realizing it’s a reaction to the person that they will see or not see during the session.

A lot of people don’t realize, even they themselves can get over their own limitations because they haven’t been practicing for long enough (year), they don’t switch up the types of targets they do, they don’t try different techniques, approaches or learn from different instructors. It’s human nature to want to avoid and move away from what one isn’t good at instead of moving towards it, and sadly that means most of us never realize our full potential.

Practice targets are available on my website, and new ones will be added periodically. Visit the following website to access the target list:

www.debrakatz.com/remote-viewing-target-practice

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